June 12, 2024

Profile: Tai chi instructor aims to teach UT students art of healing

Karl Hess has been practicing the Chinese martial arts form known as tai chi since 2000. He has now expanded his classes to include Reiki (a Japanese technique for stress reduction and relaxation that also promotes healing), metaphysical teachings and readings. With his extensive knowledge in various areas, he has started his own business called “Four Body Healing Arts.”

Photo by Luigi Scorcia creativecommons.org

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Karl Hess has been practicing the Chinese martial arts form known as tai chi since 2000. He has now expanded his classes to include Reiki (a Japanese technique for stress reduction and relaxation that also promotes healing), metaphysical teachings and readings. With his extensive knowledge in various areas, he has started his own business called “Four Body Healing Arts.”

Hess, a UT alumnus, first learned the martial art form from UT tai chi instructors Steve and Larry Brown. From there, he ventured to Washington D.C. to learn an international style of tai chi for a short time. He returned to Knoxville in 2005 and continued to broaden his knowledge by taking lessons from Dean Nardi, who specializes in a Chen style–one of the original styles of tai chi.

Hess started teaching classes about a year ago, and is currently holding class at Fourth and Gill Park and The Birdhouse. He has taught Chen style to a variety of ages from senior citizens to kids yoga. Hess has also taught at a community center.

“I enjoy teaching others,” Hess said. “That has helped deepen my own practice. I see that the benefits are many.”

Currently, Hess has taken a step back from regularly teaching classes to create his own business. “Four Body Healing Arts” offers tai chi classes, readings and a generally relaxing atmosphere to focus on the internal self.

The tai chi instructor is looking to create classes for students specifically at UT.

“I am happy to extend an offer to students who are willing to devote themselves,” Hess said.

The classes offered would work well with beginners and busy students. He adds that price and the area the classes are held will be flexible, as he understands the needs of students.

Hess wants students to enjoy all the benefits that practicing the art form can bring.

“It takes just a few minutes each day to really start to develop a practice,” Hess said. “The benefits happen quickly I think, though you may not see it.  I am happy to pass on this art form.”

You can follow Hess and his journey by subscribing to his newsletter via e-mail: karlalanhess@gmail.com. He is currently accepting private and public appointments.

Edited by Taylor Owens and Jessica Carr

Featured Image by Luigi Scorcia obtained via creativecommons.org

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