April 14, 2021

New treatment for pain involves laser technology

You hear a machine starting up. The parts boot up and a whirring sound fills your ears. A cold, metal instrument is placed on your body and steadily warms up. The warmth travels to surrounding parts of your body before the machine beeps three times and the treatment is completed.

Everyone has experienced an injury or pain before. Some go to the doctor; some stay home to let their bodies heal naturally.

Another option would be to go to a chiropractor to treat bone injuries that can happen naturally as you get older or due to a sports injury. An excellent treatment that is offered at chiropractic offices is called hot laser therapy.

Hot laser therapy is a treatment that uses a class four laser to penetrate deep into an individual, according to Erchonia, an FDA-approved laser manufacturer. It is said to offer relief from tennis elbow, strains, sprains and spasms.

Chiropractic Therapy Assistant at Integrated Medical Solutions, Adam Konz, explains that the laser uses light waves to penetrate tissue in the body at four different frequencies.

“The main important thing it’s gonna do is increase your circulation greatly in that local area,” Konz said. “It’s also going to give you some cellular energy for the healing process.”

The laser they use is classified as a cold laser, instead of a hot laser, even though the laser gets warm and can burn if left in one spot for too long. The light from both lasers interacts with the cells in the body differently.

The cold laser that Integrated Medical uses is non-invasive and causes the cells to increase in size while hot lasers cause cells to explode or ablate.

Laser treatment lasts about 5 minutes but depending on where the pain is. Adam mentions that treatment is usually performed in conjunction with chiropractic care.

“[You are] straightened out first, and then that laser therapy is gonna help keep all your muscles holding those bones in the right place, reducing inflammation that can occur,” Konz said.

Integrated Medical’s cold laser is still warm to a touch and will feel like a sunburn if left in one spot; the laser goes over a specific area and could damage tissue if not performed properly.

Factors like skin tone and tattoos also affect the warming sensation on the body.

“Pigment is what absorbs the light,” Konz said. “So, people with darker color skin are not able to use the same levels of power from the laser because it will burn much easier.”

Adjustments in the power of the laser accommodate people with darker skin.

The most that is recommended for laser treatment is twice a day, but once is good for most injuries. A patient will receive these sessions 2-3 times a week, depending on how serious their ailment is.

No medicine is needed. Laser therapy is a great alternative for people who are looking for a different type of treatment.

Edited by Maddie Torres and Ryan Sylvia

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