Democrats Hoyos, Williams Face Off Ahead of Race for Duncan’s Seat: Photo Story

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Two representative candidates met to discuss their views at a Democratic town hall Wednesday night at the University of Tennessee. Dr. Joshua Williams, left, and Renee Hoyos, are running for representative for Tennessee’s 2nd Congressional District, currently held by Jimmy Duncan.
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Hoyos cited her time as the director of the Tennessee Clean Water Network, an environmentalist group, as one of many qualifications for the job. “I’ve lobbied at the state level and the federal level. I’ve worked in public policy for 15 years. I know how to do the work of government.”
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“Right now healthcare is the number one issue for people,” Williams said. A clinical psychologist and healthcare provider, Williams said he knows how the industry works and that it’s time to get profits out of healthcare.
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Both democratic candidates voiced support for many of the same ideas, such as family reunification, funding for Planned Parenthood, and access to higher education.
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Williams also supports a $15 minimum wage and provision of better low-income housing.
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Hoyos said her time working with immigration services would help her in policy-making. “I remember when Republicans thought amnesty was a good idea.” Hoyos said she is committed to protecting so-called Dreamers, and would like to craft meaningful immigration reform.
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Running against Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett, both Democrat candidates will need to become more visible before the election. “Tennessee has the lowest voter turnout rate in the country. We’ve got to do better,” Williams says.
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“We have an opportunity to change what this district looks like that we may not get in another 20 years,” Hoyos said of Duncan’s retirement. Both candidates encouraged audience members to be involved in this election cycle.
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The town hall was hosted by the University of Tennessee’s College Democrats. The group had a booth set up for voter registration and members who could answer questions for attendees.
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The town hall was moderated by UTK College Democrats President Caroline Cranford, right, who praised the two “very fine” candidates.

 

Declining Birth Rates: From Japan to the United States

The birth rate in Japan continues to decline year-on-year, while the overall population continues to rise due to immigration. According to the CIA World Factbook of 2017, Japan is ranked 2nd for highest median age (47.3). As of October 2016 (mercatornet.com)  Japan’s birth rate fell below 1 million for the first time since 1899, while there were 1.3 million people that died the same year. If the declining birth rate continues to drop, Eric Johnston from JapanTimes states that, “896 cities, towns and villages throughout japan are facing extinction by 2040.”

 

Now, the problem seems to spread across the sea, as millennials in the U.S. refuse to have kids as well.

What is the problem with the population decline? Why do the local residents in either countries refuse to have kids?

A Graph from Osaka university (Slide 4) shows a result of a survey as to why Japanese citizens consider not to marry or to have children. The chart is separated by genders. Translated, it looks like this:

Either genders have the belief that being single means that they will have more freedom for hobbies and meeting with friends etc.

Another factor Osaka university points out is the progression of women in the workforce. The prominent answer on the female side is due to the fact that more females are now in the workforce with higher wages. This complements the other top answers, as they believe that it’s more convenient to focus on their work when they don’t have to worry about taking care of anyone else.

Below are some explanations from the survey as to why fewer Japanese people are considering marriage, or having kids.

Taking the subject matter from Japan to the United States, online articles from Rooster and Healthyway gives us some insight as to why some people in the U.S. might not consider having kids. Both articles had similar reasons, such as:

1.       The fear of raising kids in a bleak future.

2.       Financial problems.

3.       Fear of ruining their children with terrible parenting.

4.       More people wanting to pursue their goals in life. (College/Work)

5.       Fear of commitment of marriage/having kids.

Mary Sauer from Healthyway also mentioned the current position women are in, similar to the survey data seen from Osaka University. (Ex: Women are under less pressure and have more options, etc.)

According to Asia matters for America it is possible that millennials across the pacific have similar negative connotation towards having children too early. California has the highest Japanese population in the United States. To see if there are any correlation with the given data, we take a look at California’s birth rate and overall population, courtesy of the California Department of Finance:

While there might not be a direct correlation between Japanese people directly affecting U.S millennials, it’s important to consider that there is a possibility that the decline in birthrate might affect the environment you live in as well.

TNJN 360: DSLS Fall 2017 Networking Trip

This organization caters to students of all majors and works to make diversity a priority in members’ everyday lives.

Justin Crawford, a senior and Co-President of DSLS gave a definition to what the organization deems as a networking trip.

The group stayed at the Marriott Fairfield Inn & Suites Hotel located on the same street that houses University of Cincinnati’s business area. Students got a chance to settle into their rooms, enjoy food from a local eatery and given free time to explore the city.

Students woke early to eat breakfast and read up on the places they would be touring for the following day. The group toured Gyro Advertising Agency where the president Trey Harness and Executive Creative Director Mike Tittel gave them a tour of the office and explained what their company does for its clients and its employees.

They also got a chance to tour the local television station WKRC-TV. Their escort Jennifer Hosty, a local sales manager at the station answered many questions about producing a news broadcast and even got the group inside the studio to watch as the noon newscast was being televised.

New to the group and networking trips, R.J. Clay, a sophomore majoring in sports management, had a lot to say about his first time traveling with DSLS and his takeaway from this trip.

Mrs. Wirth is a woman who is highly invested in exposing members of DSLS to diversity and issues that some have, are, and will face in their lifetimes. To promote this even further she makes it a priority to take the group to some cultural place every networking trip. After touring companies, the group ended their day at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. After giving the group a few hours to roam and take in the museum, Mrs. Wirth left her group, and a few people listening in, with some words of enlightenment before packing up and heading back to Tennessee.