Small town celebrates fall with annual Apple Festival

The 37th annual Apple Festival was held in the historic streets of downtown Erwin, Tenn. from Oct. 4-5. The festival ran from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. on both days. The event contained over 350 booths, three performance stages and a children’s play area.

Attendees and vendors fill the streets at the Apple Festival.

Over 100,000 people spent their weekend celebrating fall at the Apple Festival.
Over 100,000 people spent their weekend celebrating fall at the Apple Festival.

The 37th annual Apple Festival was held in the historic streets of downtown Erwin, Tenn. from Oct. 4-5. The festival ran from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. on both days. The event contained over 350 booths, three performance stages and a children’s play area. As attendees entered the festival, they were greeted by a sign that said “Thank you for spending your weekend with us at the Unicoi County Apple Festival!”

Erwin is a small city of about 6,000 people just south of Johnson City. It is a series of houses and small businesses tucked away in the quiet Appalachian Mountains.

Since 1978, the festival has been a celebration of fall’s arrival through crafts, music and (of course) apples.

Kerry Porchè is an Erwin local who had a booth at the beginning of the festival. She is a potter who sells her work as well as gives lessons to aspiring potters.

Porchè’s booth contained hand-made mugs and dishes of various sizes. It was Porchè and her husband’s third year selling at the Apple Festival. They are just one of many faithful vendors that return each year.

Vendors and attendees alike visit the peaceful mountain city that has become a sought out tourist location during the first weekend of October due to the Apple Festival. Over 100,000 attendees are drawn in annually. These festival goers have continuously kept the streets flooded from sun up to sun down during the event.

The Apple Festival has received the Northeast Tennessee Tourism Association’s Pinnacle Award three times. This award recognizes organizations and individuals that greatly benefit Northeast Tennessee’s economy through tourism.

For more information about the Erwin Apple Festival, click here.

Edited by Jessica Carr