Sophomore Fest offers insight on campus organizations

University of Tennessee sophomores got the chance to see what they may have missed out on during their freshman year at SophoMORE Fest on Thursday in the University Center.

Sarah Bourque (left) and Emanuel Rollins, a verification specialist (right), standing beside the Office of Disability Services' booth

Sarah Bourque (left) and Emanuel Rollins, a verification specialist (right), standing beside the Office of Disability Services' booth
Sarah Bourque (left) and Emanuel Rollins, a verification specialist (right), work at SophoMORE Fest.

University of Tennessee sophomores got the chance to see what they may have missed out on during their freshman year at SophoMORE Fest on Thursday in the University Center.

Different on-campus organizations interacted with the students and helped them discover other resources UT has to offer.

Sarah Bourque, a coordinator for the Office of Disability Services, said that her resource in particular is easy for students to overlook because freshman year can be overwhelming.

“You have an opportunity to explore some things that you couldn’t get into during freshman year,” Bourque said.“There is so much going on their freshman year that they don’t even think about our office. We’re here to get those students who may have missed it their freshman year.”

Three students with the Study Abroad Office Programs: Courtney Whitlock, Abby Holt and Liz Parker, said that their booth is important to sophomores because it gives them a chance to explore  international options.

Whitlock, a junior at UT, said that sophomore year is a good year to study abroad because by junior year, students are getting into their major courses.

Kaili Jia as she receives more information from SophoMORE Fest.
Kaili Jia receives more information from UT’s SophoMORE Fest.

UT sophomore Kaili Jia said she attended SophoMORE Fest because she wanted to learn more about what she can become involved in on campus.

Jia added that sophomore year is important because it’s when students begin learning more about what they want to do with their careers.

“I want to know more about my career and internships,” Jia said.

Anton Reece, executive director of the Student Success Center, said that these events can be useful because not every sophomore knows what they want to major in.

“Just knowing that there are other people having that similar concern or feeling can be that breakpoint,” said Reece. “The better that students do at that sophomore level helps with that progression towards graduation.”

 

Edited by Maggie Jones