Humes Hall expresses diversity with the game LIFE

The Humes Hall Residence Association hosted their program Life with a Twist to allow students to participate in and learn about Diversity Week.

Participants line up on their set pieces for the game.  Danyell Luster/ TNJN
Participants line up on their set pieces for the game.
Danyell Luster/ TNJN

As part of Diversity Week, the Westside Multipurpose Room of Humes Hall was decorated with brightly colored balloons and a game board floor on Wednesday, Feb. 5, from 7-8:30 p.m. It was created by Humes Hall Residence Association’s (HHRA) program, Life with a Twist, which was a giant-size game of LIFE.

“I was kind of impressed with the turnout, because Humes sometimes doesn’t have the best turnout,” said Kristian Lewis, member of HHRA.

To start the game, students were given a card with an identity that was to remain secret until the end of the game. Identity descriptions included gay, middle-class, Christian, black, man with a partner.

The game was played by having students take steps forward or backward in response to questions concerning their assumed identity. One question asked students if their character’s religion is considered radical. Students whose cards were took two steps back. The winning card of the identity game was a white, Christian, upper-class, engaged

Humes Hall also provided food for the event.  Danyell Luster/ TNJN
Humes Hall also provided food for the event.
Danyell Luster/ TNJN

woman. To the surprise of many, eight players had the exact same identity. The goal of the game was to give students an insight into another perspective.

The game was followed by a discussion led by Charles Ezra Clifton from the Outreach Center and HHRA staff.

Katie Beckett, member of HHRA, said “we had a lot of diversity for our event.”

Issues concerning sexuality, race, religion, physical/mental capability and gender were all key topics. The discussion was open floor for students to talk and listen. Everyone was careful with phrasing and avoided terms that might be derogatory.

Student Sarah Arsenoff said “I think it really opened up a lot of minds to new ideas that hadn’t necessarily been brought up in a group setting before.”

Edited by Nichole Stevens